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The Mighty Health Benefits Of Kale

While not as well researched as some of the other cruciferous vegetables like broccoli or cabbage, kale is a food that you can count on for some outstanding health benefits, if for no other reason than its exceptional nutrient richness. Of all the super healthy greens, the health benefits of kale are king and is a great addition to a keto lifestyle.

A single cup of raw kale contains Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamins B1 (thiamin), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin) and B6, Manganese, Calcium, Copper, Potassium, Magnesium, iron and phosphorus.  Kale is one of the world’s best sources of vitamin C and contains more vitamin C than a whole orange.  It contains very little fat, but a large portion of the fat in it is an omega-3 fatty acid called alpha linolenic-acid. It’s low in calories and eating more of it is a great way to increase the total nutrient content of your diet.

High in Anti-Oxidants

Kale like many other leafy greens is very high in anti-oxidants. Antioxidants are substances that help counteract oxidative damage by free radicals in the body. Oxidative damage is believed to be among the leading causes of aging and many diseases, including cancer.  Anti-oxidants are powerful. They help protect the heart and lower blood pressure.  Anti-oxidants also have anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-depressant, and anti-cancer effects.

Reduces Cholesterol & Helps Blood Clotting

Substances found in Kale help reduce cholesterol by binding bile acids in the digestive system preventing them from being reabsorbed. This reduces the total amount of cholesterol in the body. Some studies suggest that eating steamed Kale is nearly as potent as the cholesterol-lowering drug cholestyramine.

Kale is one of the world’s best sources of vitamin K which is a critical nutrient for blood clotting.

Cancer-Fighting Compounds

There are several Cancer-fighting compounds in Kale.  Studies have shown that eating cruciferous vegetables including kale may significantly lower the risk of several cancers.

Kale is very high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant that the body can turn into vitamin A.   Important minerals such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium are also found in kale.

Good For The Eyes & Weight Loss

Kale is high in lutein and zeaxanthin, nutrients that are good for the eyes.  They have been linked to significantly reducing the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts.   Kale is good for weight loss too.  As a nutrient-dense, low-calorie food, kale makes an excellent addition to a weight loss diet.

Adding Kale to your diet is easy.   Add it to salads and smoothies.  One of my favorite drinks is a Kale Shake.  It tastes delicious and is an easy way to boost your intake of nutritional compounds. Here’s how to make it.

Kale Shake Recipe:

Mix all in a blender

2 sticks of celery
1 TBS MCT Oil, coconut or avocado oil
1-2 TBS Apple cider vinegar
1 TBS Lemon Juice
1 TBS Nutritional yeast (optional)
Add 3-4 Cups of Kale
Sweeten with Stevia to taste
12 oz of water

Blend for 2-3 minutes until smooth.  Add more water if too thick and if too watery add more Kale.  Enjoy!

Consider Loading Up On Kale

Kale is definitely one of the healthiest and most nutritious foods on the planet.  If you want to boost the number of nutrients you take in, consider loading up on kale.

Phytic Acid – Is It The Anti-Nutrient?

What Is Phytic Acid?

Phytic acid is a unique natural substance found in whole grains, legumes, potatoes, nuts, and seeds.  It is also known as a Phytate.   Phytic acid is referred to as an anti-nutrient because it impairs absorption of iron and zinc, and to a lesser, extent calcium.   However, it only impairs mineral absorption in a single meal.  In other words, it doesn’t have any effect on subsequent meals unless your diet consists of high-phytate foods.  Many times that fact gets lost in the translation and is why some say phytic acid is the anti-nutrient.  For example, snacking on nuts between meals could reduce the amount of iron, zinc, and calcium you absorb from these nuts but not from the meal you eat a few hours later.

The good news is if you do eat high-phytate foods with most of your meals, it’s rarely a concern for those who follow well-balanced diets that include meat.

How To Reduce Phytic Acid In Foods

Fortunately, several preparation methods can significantly reduce the phytic acid content of foods.

Here are the most commonly used methods:

  • Soaking:   Phytate content gets reduced when cereals and legumes are soaked in water overnight.
  • Sprouting:   The sprouting of seeds, grains, and legumes, also known as germination, causes phytate degradation.
  • Fermentation: Organic acids, formed during fermentation, promote phytate breakdown. Lactic acid fermentation is the preferred method, a good example of which is the making of sourdough.
  • Toasting:  Toasting nuts on the stove top under low heat will break down phytate in nuts.   They taste better too.

Health Benefits of Phytic Acid

Phytic acid is a good example of a nutrient that is both good and bad, depending on the circumstances.  For most people, it’s a healthy plant compound. Not only is phytic acid an antioxidant, but it may also be protective against kidney stones and cancer.

Phytic acid induces autophagy.   Autophagy is a cellular process for degrading and recycling junk proteins.  It plays a role in the destruction of pathogens inside our cells.   And, autophagy is believed to be particularly beneficial in neurodegenerative disorders – Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Huntington’s Disease.   This is because these disorders are, in part, characterized by the accumulation of disease-causing proteins

Is Phytic Acid a Health Concern?

It can be.  Phytic acid is not a health concern for those who follow a balanced diet.  However, those at risk of an iron or zinc deficiency should diversify their diets and not include high-phytate foods in all meals.  This is especially important for those with an iron deficiency, as well as vegetarians and vegans.

Overall, the benefits of phytic acid outweigh any negative effects on mineral absorption when preparation methods are used to reduce it and when eating a well-balanced diet.

How To Reduce Phytic Acid In Foods

Fortunately, several preparation methods can significantly reduce the phytic acid content of foods.

Here are the most commonly used methods:

  • Soaking:   Phytate content gets reduced when cereals and legumes are soaked in water overnight.
  • Sprouting:   The sprouting of seeds, grains, and legumes, also known as germination, causes phytate degradation.
  • Fermentation: Organic acids, formed during fermentation, promote phytate breakdown. Lactic acid fermentation is the preferred method, a good example of which is the making of sourdough.
  • Toasting:  Toasting nuts on the stove top under low heat will break down phytate in nuts.   They taste better too.

Health Benefits of Phytic Acid

Phytic acid is a good example of a nutrient that is both good and bad, depending on the circumstances.  For most people, it’s a healthy plant compound. Not only is phytic acid an antioxidant, but it may also be protective against kidney stones and cancer.

Phytic acid induces autophagy.   Autophagy is a cellular process for degrading and recycling junk proteins.  It plays a role in the destruction of pathogens inside our cells.   And, autophagy is believed to be particularly beneficial in neurodegenerative disorders – Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Huntington’s Disease.   This is because these disorders are, in part, characterized by the accumulation of disease-causing proteins

Is Phytic Acid a Health Concern?

It can be.  Phytic acid is not a health concern for those who follow a balanced diet.  However, those at risk of an iron or zinc deficiency should diversify their diets and not include high-phytate foods in all meals.  This is especially important for those with an iron deficiency, as well as vegetarians and vegans.

Overall, the benefits of phytic acid outweigh any negative effects on mineral absorption when preparation methods are used to reduce it and when eating a well-balanced diet.

 

Why Butter Is Good For You!

Why Is Butter Good For You?

Some nutrition experts claim it is a superfood and as you read this article you will see why butter is good for you.  Although it’s not on the top of the list, it is abundant with several nutrients.  It’s high in vitamin A and is closely comparable to Kale in that regard.  It’s a unique vitamin A.

Butter does not cause irritation to your liver and gallbladder.   Therefore, consuming this food along with liver friendly foods allows your liver to continue to heal.  It’s also high in vitamin D which helps with bone and calcium transportation and it contains vitamin E in addition to vitamin F.

What Is Vitamin F?

Vitamin F is better known as linoleic acid, an omega-6 essential fatty acid (EFA).  It plays a crucial role, in tandem with omega-3 EFAs,  in brain function, normal growth, skin and hair regeneration, bone health, and metabolic function.  As a reciprocal hormone with vitamin D, they work together in keeping viruses in remission.  When you are lacking vitamin F you may also find you sunburn more easily & the sunburn does not heal as quickly.

Another vital vitamin in butter is vitamin K2.  Vitamin K2 is good for bone health, good for your teeth and it helps prevent cavities.  It is also rich in lecithin, selenium, and iodine.   Lecithin is the antidote to cholesterol.   Whereas, the nutrients selenium and iodine are especially helpful for someone who is hypothyroid.

Butter has Omega 3 and Omega 6 fats, AND it’s an MCT (medium chain triglyceride fat) meaning its a healthy fat that does not convert to fat.   In other words, it does NOT make you fat.

We’ve Been Told Butter Is “Bad” – No Way!

For years, we have been told not to consume butter because it’s BAD for you.   Probably because the industrialized food industry could make money on pushing bad stuff like margarine and soy-based replacements.  Did you know, there is no study to date that shows consuming butter will clog your arteries?

It is also one of the few foods that have lauric acid.  Lauric acid is good for weight loss and is anti-tumor and anti-cancer.  It is good for regulating metabolism.   By the way, the only foods lauric acid can be found in is butter, coconut oil, and breast milk.  Now no normal adult will consume breast milk right?  So our choices are butter and coconut milk.

Another amazing feature is that it doesn’t turn in adipose tissue.  And, it’s easy to digest because it bypasses the liver and gallbladder.  In fact. Olive oil is harder to digest than butter.

Lastly, taking some before sleeping can help you sleep because it enhances the absorption of calcium from the vitamin D and the vitamin F.

As you can see butter is not only a delicious and nutritious superfood, it is good for you!   Always consume varieties that either organic, grass-fed or hormone free.  Bon Appetit!

Lies My Doctor Told Me: How the Standard American Diet Materialized

This is a riveting replay from Tom Bilyeu’s Health Theory.  In this episode he interviews the author of Lies My Doctor Told Me, Dr. Ken Berry.   Tom and Dr. Barry discuss an array of topics with a focus on the lies doctors are telling their patients and how the standard American diet materialized.

Dr. Berry struggled with excessive weight when he became an adult.  He grew up with the same dietary misinformation most people have.  At nearly 300 pounds he could no longer advise his overweight patients to lose weight when he was so overweight himself.  He knew he had to lead by example for his patients to have confidence in the advice he was giving them.

Realizing the nutrition education he got in medical school was extremely flawed he embarked on researching how the human body processes food.   He discovered ancestral eating was the key to having healthy body composition.  With the backing of over 100 years of medical research, he discovered the ketogenic diet closely resembles how our ancestors ate.   He adjusted his diet to the macronutrient requirements of the ketogenic diet and eventually returned to normal body weight and normal blood chemistry.   Rather than managing patients with medication, he treats them with sound dietary education and guidance.

Enjoy!

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