January 2019 - Page 2 of 3 - Keto Fit & Trim

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Monthly Archives: January 2019

Recipe: Tuscan Creamy Garlic Shrimp

This Tuscan creamy garlic shrimp recipe is so versatile.  You can substitute the shrimp with any kind of protein for a delish variation of this dish.  We have used chicken, beef, pork and jumbo shrimp.  This dish is a rated 5 stars in our home.

Ingredients:

  • 1-1.5 pounds of Jumbo Shrimp or Tiger Prawns cut into bite size pieces
  • 1 tablespoon of organic or grass-fed butter, olive or avocado oil
  • 1 medium diced onion
  • 5-6 slices of bacon
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic (diced)
  • 2 cans of organic mushrooms, drained
  • 1 cup of kale or spinach
  • Organic heavy cream
  • Pot of salted water for shrimp

Saute in butter, avocado or olive oil – 1 medium diced onion, 3-4 cloves of garlic, 2 can’s of organic mushrooms. Put to side when translucent.

Cook 5-6 strips of cut up bacon, save 2 TBSP of bacon grease.

Saute the shrimp (or protein choice in the bacon grease) until cooked through.

Add the sauteed onions, garlic and mushrooms back in the skillet with the cooked shrimp.

Add 1/2 to 1 cup of heavy cream. Blend well.

Salt and pepper to taste.

Add the cut up spinach or kale for color and blend until wilted.

Serve!

This is a top-rated dinner at our house. We never have left overs.

Enjoy!  Bon Appetit

Recipe: Peanut Butter Fat Bombs

Feeling like you want something sweet but you don’t want to blow your diet? These delicious, creamy Chocolate Peanut Butter Fat Bombs will satisfy your sweet tooth and keep you from blowing your diet.

Items needed:

Organic Peanut Butter
Organic Coconut Oil or MCT Oil
Unsweetened cocoa
Butter – Grass Fed or Organic
Swerve
Medium size mixing bowl
Large spoon
Candy molds, ice cube tray, or small candy paper cups
Baking sheet

Ingredients

3/4 Cup of melted coconut oil
1/2 Cup + 3 TBS Peanut Butter
3 TBS Cocoa
1/2 Cup Melted Butter
3 TBS Swerve (Confectioners style)

Mix all ingredients together in mixing bowl and stir quickly until all ingredients are blended.
Put candy molds, paper cups, ice cube tray on medium sized baking sheet.
Pour fat bomb mixture into a small measuring cup.
Use the measuring cup to fill the candy molds.
Put the baking sheet with filled molds in the freezer for 30 minutes then eat!

Fat Bombs must be kept in the freezer. They will melt at room temperature.

Serving size:

1 if using an ice cube tray
1-2 if using small paper cups
2-3 if using small candy molds

Recipe: Kale Shake

Mix all in a blender

2 sticks of celery
1/4 c broccoli
1/4 c cauliflower
1 avocado
1 TBS MCT Oil, coconut or avocado oil
1-2 TBS Apple cider vinegar
1 TBS Lemon Juice
1 TBS Nutritional yeast (optional)
1 tsp beet powder (optional)
Stuff remaining space with Kale or spinach or 50/50 blend of each
Sweeten with Stevia to taste
12 oz of water

Blend until smooth. If more water is needed add it. If too watery add more Kale.

The Mighty Health Benefits Of Kale

While not as well researched as some of the other cruciferous vegetables like broccoli or cabbage, kale is a food that you can count on for some outstanding health benefits, if for no other reason than its exceptional nutrient richness. Of all the super healthy greens, the health benefits of kale are king and is a great addition to a keto lifestyle.

A single cup of raw kale contains Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamins B1 (thiamin), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin) and B6, Manganese, Calcium, Copper, Potassium, Magnesium, iron and phosphorus.  Kale is one of the world’s best sources of vitamin C and contains more vitamin C than a whole orange.  It contains very little fat, but a large portion of the fat in it is an omega-3 fatty acid called alpha linolenic-acid. It’s low in calories and eating more of it is a great way to increase the total nutrient content of your diet.

High in Anti-Oxidants

Kale like many other leafy greens is very high in anti-oxidants. Antioxidants are substances that help counteract oxidative damage by free radicals in the body. Oxidative damage is believed to be among the leading causes of aging and many diseases, including cancer.  Anti-oxidants are powerful. They help protect the heart and lower blood pressure.  Anti-oxidants also have anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-depressant, and anti-cancer effects.

Reduces Cholesterol & Helps Blood Clotting

Substances found in Kale help reduce cholesterol by binding bile acids in the digestive system preventing them from being reabsorbed. This reduces the total amount of cholesterol in the body. Some studies suggest that eating steamed Kale is nearly as potent as the cholesterol-lowering drug cholestyramine.

Kale is one of the world’s best sources of vitamin K which is a critical nutrient for blood clotting.

Cancer-Fighting Compounds

There are several Cancer-fighting compounds in Kale.  Studies have shown that eating cruciferous vegetables including kale may significantly lower the risk of several cancers.

Kale is very high in beta-carotene, an antioxidant that the body can turn into vitamin A.   Important minerals such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium are also found in kale.

Good For The Eyes & Weight Loss

Kale is high in lutein and zeaxanthin, nutrients that are good for the eyes.  They have been linked to significantly reducing the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts.   Kale is good for weight loss too.  As a nutrient-dense, low-calorie food, kale makes an excellent addition to a weight loss diet.

Adding Kale to your diet is easy.   Add it to salads and smoothies.  One of my favorite drinks is a Kale Shake.  It tastes delicious and is an easy way to boost your intake of nutritional compounds. Here’s how to make it.

Kale Shake Recipe:

Mix all in a blender

2 sticks of celery
1 TBS MCT Oil, coconut or avocado oil
1-2 TBS Apple cider vinegar
1 TBS Lemon Juice
1 TBS Nutritional yeast (optional)
Add 3-4 Cups of Kale
Sweeten with Stevia to taste
12 oz of water

Blend for 2-3 minutes until smooth.  Add more water if too thick and if too watery add more Kale.  Enjoy!

Consider Loading Up On Kale

Kale is definitely one of the healthiest and most nutritious foods on the planet.  If you want to boost the number of nutrients you take in, consider loading up on kale.

Phytic Acid – Is It The Anti-Nutrient?

What Is Phytic Acid?

Phytic acid is a unique natural substance found in whole grains, legumes, potatoes, nuts, and seeds.  It is also known as a Phytate.   Phytic acid is referred to as an anti-nutrient because it impairs absorption of iron and zinc, and to a lesser, extent calcium.   However, it only impairs mineral absorption in a single meal.  In other words, it doesn’t have any effect on subsequent meals unless your diet consists of high-phytate foods.  Many times that fact gets lost in the translation and is why some say phytic acid is the anti-nutrient.  For example, snacking on nuts between meals could reduce the amount of iron, zinc, and calcium you absorb from these nuts but not from the meal you eat a few hours later.

The good news is if you do eat high-phytate foods with most of your meals, it’s rarely a concern for those who follow well-balanced diets that include meat.

How To Reduce Phytic Acid In Foods

Fortunately, several preparation methods can significantly reduce the phytic acid content of foods.

Here are the most commonly used methods:

  • Soaking:   Phytate content gets reduced when cereals and legumes are soaked in water overnight.
  • Sprouting:   The sprouting of seeds, grains, and legumes, also known as germination, causes phytate degradation.
  • Fermentation: Organic acids, formed during fermentation, promote phytate breakdown. Lactic acid fermentation is the preferred method, a good example of which is the making of sourdough.
  • Toasting:  Toasting nuts on the stove top under low heat will break down phytate in nuts.   They taste better too.

Health Benefits of Phytic Acid

Phytic acid is a good example of a nutrient that is both good and bad, depending on the circumstances.  For most people, it’s a healthy plant compound. Not only is phytic acid an antioxidant, but it may also be protective against kidney stones and cancer.

Phytic acid induces autophagy.   Autophagy is a cellular process for degrading and recycling junk proteins.  It plays a role in the destruction of pathogens inside our cells.   And, autophagy is believed to be particularly beneficial in neurodegenerative disorders – Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Huntington’s Disease.   This is because these disorders are, in part, characterized by the accumulation of disease-causing proteins

Is Phytic Acid a Health Concern?

It can be.  Phytic acid is not a health concern for those who follow a balanced diet.  However, those at risk of an iron or zinc deficiency should diversify their diets and not include high-phytate foods in all meals.  This is especially important for those with an iron deficiency, as well as vegetarians and vegans.

Overall, the benefits of phytic acid outweigh any negative effects on mineral absorption when preparation methods are used to reduce it and when eating a well-balanced diet.

How To Reduce Phytic Acid In Foods

Fortunately, several preparation methods can significantly reduce the phytic acid content of foods.

Here are the most commonly used methods:

  • Soaking:   Phytate content gets reduced when cereals and legumes are soaked in water overnight.
  • Sprouting:   The sprouting of seeds, grains, and legumes, also known as germination, causes phytate degradation.
  • Fermentation: Organic acids, formed during fermentation, promote phytate breakdown. Lactic acid fermentation is the preferred method, a good example of which is the making of sourdough.
  • Toasting:  Toasting nuts on the stove top under low heat will break down phytate in nuts.   They taste better too.

Health Benefits of Phytic Acid

Phytic acid is a good example of a nutrient that is both good and bad, depending on the circumstances.  For most people, it’s a healthy plant compound. Not only is phytic acid an antioxidant, but it may also be protective against kidney stones and cancer.

Phytic acid induces autophagy.   Autophagy is a cellular process for degrading and recycling junk proteins.  It plays a role in the destruction of pathogens inside our cells.   And, autophagy is believed to be particularly beneficial in neurodegenerative disorders – Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, ALS and Huntington’s Disease.   This is because these disorders are, in part, characterized by the accumulation of disease-causing proteins

Is Phytic Acid a Health Concern?

It can be.  Phytic acid is not a health concern for those who follow a balanced diet.  However, those at risk of an iron or zinc deficiency should diversify their diets and not include high-phytate foods in all meals.  This is especially important for those with an iron deficiency, as well as vegetarians and vegans.

Overall, the benefits of phytic acid outweigh any negative effects on mineral absorption when preparation methods are used to reduce it and when eating a well-balanced diet.

 

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